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Is corn good for diabetics?

Is corn good for diabetics?

Is corn good for diabetics?

 

What is Corn?

 

Corn is a popular starchy vegetable that grows on long stems. About half of the world’s maize is grown in the western part of the United States, and the rest comes from South America, China, and Eastern Europe. From the first corn in your soda to the highest fructose corn syrup, corn products are everywhere. Because corn is the staple food in most countries and it is widely grown, it is usually cheaper. But while this is important, for diabetics, it does not make a good friend.

Corn nutrition facts

 

Cooked yellow sweet corn for a medium ear (103 g):

 

  • Calories: 1
  • Carbohydrate: 21.6 grams
  • Fiber: 2.5 g
  • Protein: 3.5 grams
  • Fat: 1.5 grams

Corn is starchy and most starches are high carbohydrate foods that you want to avoid.

Yes, corn has some protein, fat and fiber, but 2.9 grams less fiber than 21.6 grams of carbohydrates!

Compare this to an average carrot with 5.8 g of carbohydrates and 1.7 g of fiber. Or the average head of cooked broccoli at 12.9 g carbohydrates and 5.9 g fiber – these low carbohydrate vegetables are great for controlling blood sugar and A1c!

On the other hand, the carbohydrates in corn will break down into sugar and be absorbed into your bloodstream more quickly. And it’s the high blood sugar that you want to prevent to reduce the risk of diabetes disorders.

Carbohydrates in the diet for diabetes

 

Everyone needs carbohydrates to fuel their body function, but the amount of carbohydrate you need each day depends on your sex, weight and physical activity factors. A nutritionist can help you reach the number that works for you. In general, however, most diabetic adults should not consume more than 200 grams of carbohydrates per day, according to the US National Library of Medicine.

Diabetes statistics show that about 34 million American adults are at risk, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A healthy diet for diabetics is actually the same as a healthy diet for everyone, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whole foods instead of processed foods work best for health. To do this, people with diabetes should focus on foods that are low in saturated fat, sugar and sodium, and opt for lean proteins such as fish and chicken. Non-starchy vegetables such as greens and peppers; Fruit juices; And healthy fats often.

Starchy foods are not off the menu, he said. All you need to do is pay close attention to the size of the serving. The serving size for starchy vegetables such as corn or potatoes is 1/2 cup cooked, while 1/3 cup cooked is the serving size for starchy foods such as rice and pasta.

As a visual aid, if you divide a 9-inch plate into quarters, you will get one-fourth of fat protein such as cooked salmon or chicken breast, another quarter with starch like corn or brown rice and the other half Fill with non-greasy. – Starchy vegetables such as boiled broccoli, pink or green.

Corn and diabetes

 

If you count carbohydrates as part of your diet, serving half a cup of sweet cooked corn gives you 16 grams of carbohydrates, while a small ear about 6 inches long weighs 19 grams.

For those who consult a glycemic indicator when choosing a carbohydrate – a means of measuring how quickly a carbohydrate-rich food converts to glucose – sweet corn falls into the “moderate” GI category, according to Harvard. Scale 52 receives. Health Broadcast.

However, be aware of unhealthy additions to your cooked corn, such as butter and salt, which add saturated fat and sodium to your vegetables. Try serving corn on the cob with a butter substitute and fresh herbs such as basil or cilantro.

You can also enjoy other foods that contain corn, such as air-popped popcorn, which contains 6 grams of carbohydrates per cup; and popcorn cake, which weighs 8 grams per cake. For all processed foods with corn, check the nutrition label for their carbohydrate content.

As part of a healthy diet, corn provides other valuable nutrients such as fiber for digestive health; Vitamin A, for eyes and skin; And B-family vitamins, which are beneficial for nerve and brain health.

 

Conclusion

 

It is safe to say that corn is not really suitable for a low carbohydrate, diabetes friendly diet.

Fat, protein and high fiber foods will stabilize your blood sugar and help you reach your goals. So, eat corn and save yourself extra carbohydrates.

And overall you shouldn’t miss out on corn. There are many more delicious vegetables to enjoy. And with the blood sugar-friendly vegetables you have available, actually enjoy hundreds (if not thousands) of low-carb foods – foods that don’t raise your blood sugar!

What do you think?

Written by talk

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